Publication - 30.07.2013
Time management can be one of the most frustrating parts of a project manager's job. Being trapped between a workforce motivated often by those interested in self-preservation and those with hoping to build a reputation will yield inaccurate time data.  As a consequence, upper management will suffer from unrealistic expectations and be put under pressure trying to please the client, leaving you are between the proverbial rock and hard place. In a worst-case scenario terrible time management is one symptom of a death-march project.It doesn't have to be that way. With a well-designed and
Publication - 02.03.2013
In business today organisations manage multiple projects concurrently with shared or overlapping resources, often in different geographical locations. Today's traditional project management methodologies and techniques do not recognise the reality of organisational structures and workplace priorities, nor do they leverage the potential benefits that accrue from multi-skilled and multi-location teams. Programme management is a technique that allows organisations to run multiple, related projects concurrently to obtain significant benefits from them as a group.Programme management is a way to
Publication - 22.01.2013
For any organisation or individual that needs to manage and control related projects (portfolio of projects), Managing Successful Programmes (MSP) programme management is a management tool for bringing together people, activities and information to achieve the end goal.History of MSP Programme ManagementMSP programme management was developed by the Office of Government Commerce (OGC), an independent Office of the UK Treasury, and supported by a full range of commercial partners. It was first released in 1999, and in 2007 a third version was released to reflect the evolving knowledge of
Publication - 16.01.2013
Although it is accepted that extraordinary levels of quality improvement are possible only by a radical change in management philosophy, leading to change in organisational culture, the fact remains that the exercise of undertaking process improvement projects cannot be overlooked for actual change to occur. Projects are the bridge between two parts, comprising of planning and doing. Although apparently similar, project and planning are different in scope.Project And PlanningThe dictionary definitions of the word "project" describe it as being a scheme, plan, proposal or an enterprise
Publication - 10.01.2013
What is a PMO? A PMO is a centralised, co-ordinating body within an organisation (or project) that provides a focal point for the field of project management. It can identify and address project management issues to support and facilitate the achievement of organisational project outcomes. What are the benefits of having a PMO? According to Gartner (2008), investments in a Project Management Office (PMO) as a work management discipline can provide common planning and reporting processes and bring structure and support to evaluating, justifying, defining, planning, tracking and
Publication - 15.12.2012
Every major change management programme puts shareholder value at risk. If the project succeeds and meets its objectives, then shareholders benefit. If it fails or even partially fails, then the value of the company may fall and keep falling. And CEOs don’t usually survive such an outcome.Ask any programme sponsor what the biggest threats are to a major project and you are likely to get similar answers: a lack of leadership and drive and not enough focus on business risk. Take the recent example of G4S’s catastrophic failure to deliver against the terms of its security contract for the London